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Cochlear Implants

Cochlear Implants are a hot topic in the Deaf Community.  Share your insights in this blog.

87 Comments to Cochlear Implants:

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Jillian Coulter on Monday, November 21, 2016 8:04 PM
A cochlear implants is a device that is surgically implanted in someones ear that can help someone with a hearing disability hear. According to http://connectusfund.org, "it stimulates just a few locations in the cochlea, replacing the functions of thousands nerves fibers. This improves hearing and allows deaf individuals to hear sounds." The idea of giving someone who is deaf the ability to hear is absolutely wonderful! It can open up a world of new opportunities. However, like most surgeries, there are risks. There is the potential of nerve damage and injury. After surgery, there is also a risk of infection. I hope this has helped some of you! Here are some links I used to read about the subject. http://connectusfund.org/11-predominant-pros-and-cons-of-cochlear-implants http://www.cochlear.com/wps/wcm/connect/au/home/understand/hearing-and-hl/hl-treatments/cochlear-implant https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p4C5O_OgR0s
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Madeleine Fordham on Thursday, November 24, 2016 1:46 PM
I noticed in the first link you posted (11 Predominant Pros and Cons of Cochlear Implants) it says "Most individuals born deaf learn to communicate through lip reading". I would think that most individuals born deaf would learn to communicate through sign language. Am I incorrect, or is that an oversight on the page?


Kacie O'Connell on Friday, November 25, 2016 2:38 PM
I knew there were risks to the surgery, but I didn't think to consider infection. I like how you included these specific risks of the surgery.


Rachel Granger on Saturday, November 26, 2016 3:15 AM
I really liked your explanation of the procedure. Also, infection after the surgery never registered to me. Thank you for bringing my attention to that. I did not think of that health risk.


Victoria Dias on Saturday, November 26, 2016 8:47 PM
I liked how well detailed this was and all the information you added. It was interesting to hear about the risks!


Jannette Rivera Vega on Sunday, November 27, 2016 8:21 PM
One of the reseach I did The mother of a 13 yaer old shared that her daughter had a blood clot caused by the surgery the cloth appear years after she had it but because of that her daughter did not want to use the cochlear implant again. And other person shared that even with the surgery he couldn't hear.


Jennifer Gonzalez-Morales on Sunday, November 27, 2016 11:00 PM
Madeline; You are right in the sense that you are incorrect. Not all deaf children learn ASL. I learned in my Intro to Deaf class that 90% of the deaf children are born to hearing parents and the other 10% to deaf parents. If the hearing parents do not know anything about deaf culture and ASL they are most likely to follow the advice that doctors (who do not know about deaf culture) give to them.


Jane Mairs on Wednesday, February 01, 2017 9:37 AM
Ever since I first heard about cochlear implants, I've been thinking about their risks and rewards. In this posting I learned that the surgery itself has associated risks, such as infection - as with any surgical procedure. But another risk I am concerned about is whether the use cochlear implants discourages the use of ASL, and thereby robs Deaf people of a beautiful, expressive, language that suits their strengths and talents so well, and instead encourages them to use a mode of communication that is inherently challenging for them. If this is true, it strikes me as a terrible loss, for Deaf people and for hearing people.


Jane Mairs on Wednesday, February 01, 2017 9:39 AM
Ever since I first heard about cochlear implants, I've been thinking about their risks and rewards. In this posting I learned that the surgery itself has associated risks, such as infection - as with any surgical procedure. But another risk I am concerned about is whether the use cochlear implants discourages the use of ASL, and thereby robs Deaf people of a beautiful, expressive, language that suits their strengths and talents so well, and instead encourages them to use a mode of communication that is inherently challenging for them. If this is true, it strikes me as a terrible loss, for Deaf people and for hearing people.


Madeleine Fordham on Monday, November 21, 2016 8:48 PM
http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/ProductsandMedicalProcedures/ImplantsandProsthetics/CochlearImplants/ucm062843.htm “Benefits and Risks of Cochlear Implants.” U.S. Food and Drug Administration.U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 6 June 2016. Web. 21 Nov. 2016 Precursor: I chose this article because it was the most extensive, and also offered the least use of words like “normal/abnormal” and “regular/irregular” when referring to hearing vs hearing loss. It did use the words “near normal ability” in regards to hearing but that's all. This article discussed the pros and cons of having a cochlear. Many of the pros were about regaining hearing in some sense. Being able to hear in of itself was one of course, and being able to comprehend a range of volumes and sounds. Being able to watch TV or make phone calls were also cited. As for the cons, which were much more numerous, they were broken into three sections - anesthesia, surgery, and others. Anesthesia of course has risks associated with any surgery. Then the surgery itself poses the injury of facial nerves, meningitis, perilymph fluid leak (which is fluid leaking from the inner ear), and tinnitus (which is a ringing in the ear) just to name a few. The risks after the surgery were the ones I never really thought about - like being unable swim with it or setting off a metal detector when trying to get through security at an airport or courthouse. Other possibilities are not being able to upgrade if new inventions are incompatible with your current cochlear, having to be very careful of static electricity, and not being able to have certain procedures, like an MRI, in case of damaging the cochlear. And of course, there is the chance that a cochlear just may not work for someone, or stop working over time. This didn’t really change my opinion of cochlear’s, except to become a little more skeptical than I already was about them. Sidenote: None of the articles I skimmed mentioned Deaf culture or Deafness in them at all, which I found a tad strange. ASL and signing vs. cochlear's and speech is a HUGE and ongoing conversation in the Deaf/deaf communities. It seems to me as if cochlear's and the use of ASL are presented as completely separate entities - which doesn't make a whole lot of sense to me.
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Anonymous on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 1:25 PM
I like your point about not being able to upgrade to new inventions. That could be tricky if the company that made your product goes out of business. That's a con I didn't think about before. Knowing that now I may rethink my position.


Jillian Coulter on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 1:26 PM
Anonymous on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 1:25 PM I like your point about not being able to upgrade to new inventions. That could be tricky if the company that made your product goes out of business. That's a con I didn't think about before. Knowing that now I may rethink my position.


Kacie O'Connell on Friday, November 25, 2016 2:43 PM
I never thought of many of these risks or setbacks either! I think this has changed my view on cochlear implants because I didn't realize the inconveniences such as not be able to swim with it, or setting off metal detectors.


Haley Asselin on Saturday, November 26, 2016 12:07 PM
Helping to learn about the affects of the cochlear implants definitely make you think more about it. It may be worth it but there is a lot to learn about it before and you explained how it could be worth it but they're are some disadvantages. For example like not being able to swim with it or setting off metal detectors.


Eric Carreira on Sunday, November 27, 2016 8:42 PM
Madeline, I like the criteria you used in selecting your article, avoiding articles with language such as "normal/abnormal", "regular/irregular." I also agree with your disappointment about the lack of references to Deaf culture in many articles. This is why I chose to talk about an article about cochlear implants from a perspective of the Deaf community, rather than a medical/anatomical/technological point of view. The list of risks as given by the FDA in your link are rather eye-opening. Similar to you, I find these risks to make me view cochlear implants more critically and skeptically. However, at all times everyone needs to be open minded and respectful of whatever decisions an individual or a family makes.


Eric Carreira on Sunday, November 27, 2016 8:44 PM
Sorry for misspelling your name! Oops! :(


Kacie O'Connell on Friday, November 25, 2016 2:34 PM
Before reading this article (https://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/cochlear-implants)I thought I at least knew the basics as to how cochlear implants worked. However, after reading, I realized that the way cochlear implants work is much more impressive than I originally thought. The devices completely "bypass the damaged portions of the ear and directly stimulate the auditory nerve." Cochlear implants were first for adults only but became safe for children in 2000. It was discovered that the device shows the best results when implanted in young children so they can learn to adjust to the sounds around them from an early age. I did not realize before that receiving a Cochlear implant requires not only a surgical procedure but also intense therapy sessions afterwards. There are risk factors to this procedure, but they are low. The cost is very high and the implants do not have the same benefits for everyone so the decision to receive this implant must be long and well-thought through
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Rachel Granger on Saturday, November 26, 2016 3:24 AM
I also did not realize someone would need therapy sessions after the surgery. The therapy is long and intense, I read about someone who received therapy for 11 years after she received the implants. Before reading my article, I thought the health risks of the implants were the only disadvantages. But not everyone's advantages are the same.


Madeleine Fordham on Saturday, November 26, 2016 2:57 PM
I actually didn't know they could be used for adults at all when I was younger. I thought you HAD to get one at a young age, and if you didn't - tough luck. I was really surprised to hear that although they work BETTER with younger children, they work FASTER with adults. Maybe that has something to do with brain development?


Jillian Coulter on Saturday, November 26, 2016 7:51 PM
I did not think about the cost of the procedure. I wonder how many insurance companies would cover it.


Victoria Dias on Saturday, November 26, 2016 8:50 PM
I'm very interested on how you mentioned the theapy sessions after. The pricing on the implant was a good thing to learn!


Madison Rix on Sunday, November 27, 2016 12:48 AM
When i read my article, the risks seemed high to me. Maybe the risks are diminishing or becoming less severe. I didn't read that they were first made for adults in mind, which is interesting and i guess after trial and error is 2000 they became safe for kids. I wouldve assumed it would've been the other way around. After reading your research, I still stick with being against them. All in all there are risks and not being able to hear is not a bad thing. I understand why parents could have them implanted for their children but their children would never experience their life being deaf. Also, being young and getting this surgery done may cause risks in the future that no none has discovered yet.


Felicia Verville on Sunday, November 27, 2016 12:52 AM
I find it interesting that these implants became safe for children in 2000 when these implants actually work the best fro children since they are young, and hopefully does not have that much of a health history. I didn't know that along with the surgery, follows very intense therapy sessions. I found that it also requires lots of maintence such as changing the battery, replacing wires, etc.


Robin Fordham on Sunday, November 27, 2016 4:38 PM
As a parent, I do not know what I would choose if my child were born deaf and cochlear implants were an option. I think sign language is an amazing and beautiful language and culture. I can also understand that many of the challenges of parenting are intensified when having to learn a new language to communicate with one's child, so I can understand the choice for an implant in a hearing family. I myself experienced reversible conductive hearing loss (not related to the nerves) in both my ears when I was in my twenties. My surgeries restored my hearing to normal, and I was amazed at how this was possible. I sometimes forget that I went through this experience (because I lost hearing in each ear at separate times, my experience was not too challenging, although I could not conduct conversations between rooms, and had to rely strongly on lipreading to help my comprehension). Had this surgery not been available (stapedectomy was first performed in 1956!), I would have become a member of the Deaf community. Thus, I was someone who chose technology in order to restore my hearing. Oddly enough, this does not mean I would immediately choose a cochlear implant for myself or my child. These are very complicated decisions!!


Rachel Granger on Saturday, November 26, 2016 3:10 AM
To learn more about the advantages and disadvantages of cochlear implants I read " In The Deaf Community, There Are Pros And Cons Of Receiving A Cochlear Implant" (Contributor, Quora. "The Pros And Cons Of Receiving A Cochlear Implant." Medical Daily. IBT Media Inc., 23 July 2016. Web. 26 Nov. 2016.). I learned about the pros and cons of cochlear implants from someone who received them at 6 years old. Before reading this article, I lacked knowledge of the health risks there are for getting the surgery for the implants. On top of that, they are very expensive. However, what really stood out to me was the impact the implants made on her language. I never thought about how the author wouldn't understand spoken language. It took the author 7 years to learn to speak fully. She was in therapy for a total of 11 years. She also faced discrimination from others in and out of the deaf community. However, it was an amazing transformation from the deaf world to the hearing world. The author wanted to know everything everyone knew including the hearing people. She was pleased with the results from the surgery, however not everyone is. So to decide to receive cochlear implants is a decision that needs to be thought out thoroughly. The benefits are to learn to understand the hearing world and experience sound. However, they're costly and there are risks for the surgery. Also a lot of time and hard-work in therapy to understand sound. But the journey maybe worth it.
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Haley Asselin on Saturday, November 26, 2016 12:04 PM
I really liked how you explained all the little details of the cochlear implants. I agree before I read this article my knowledge about cochlear implants was lacking. I also did not know you need therapy sessions after the surgery.


Madeleine Fordham on Saturday, November 26, 2016 3:00 PM
I never thought therapy would take so long! I think cochlears are presented (on the surface), as this magical, instant cure, when really they're anything but. They take a long time to work, a lot of effort and money and time. They're not perfect, some people don't end up liking them, and they're much more complex than they appear.


Madison Rix on Sunday, November 27, 2016 12:42 AM
Before reading your comment, I didn't realize that there are women and men in the deaf community, who have been deaf for a long time who would want to get the implants. I still stand against them but it is very eye opening to see a women so happy. When I think about people in the deaf community getting these, I picture it being young kids who do not have a choice. To hear is a wonderful ability, but there so are many things that are different and positive about not being able to hear. You are much more appreciative in different, simple ways. I do think it is amazing for the women who got them done and her experience and fight through discrimination.


Robin Fordham on Sunday, November 27, 2016 4:25 PM
It had not occurred to that someone within the deaf community might face discrimination for choosing to get a cochlear implant. I watched a movie recently (Sound and Fury) which showed two brothers (one Deaf, one hearing) who had Deaf children. The hearing family chose the cochlear implant, and the other family chose not have their daughter receive a cochlear implant. I was so surprised at the heightened emotions on either side. Each family struggled with their own and the other family's decision, and each felt very hurt by the reaction of the other. I think understanding this aspect of the choice made me change my thinking in the sense that I do not think it is an easy choice on either side, and that maybe there is no 'right' and 'wrong' answer, but only what is right for the individual and the family.


Jannette Rivera Vega on Sunday, November 27, 2016 8:12 PM
Been part of a culture is one thing but believe in it is the most important I like the way you explain this in a simple way. I think like you that this should be a very thoughful desicion any person who want to be part of the hearing culture is a decision that is not taken overnight and my opinion it should be a personal choice. I know that some people would like to be part of the hearing culture or maybe just part of the hearing population, to be able to see everything from a different point. I do not criticize families who decide that their children should have the implant because that gives them a choices to see and learn to diferent cultures and haved the opportunity to grow and be who ever they feel to be. It is incredible to see how a single theme leads us to learn so many different things


Charity Ward on Sunday, November 27, 2016 10:51 PM
I also lacked knowledge on cochlear implants before I started looking into articles. I had no idea that therapy could take so long, and it must take a lot of effort to continue and proceed with working with the implants.


Haley Asselin on Saturday, November 26, 2016 12:24 PM
I learned about the pros and cons of the cochlear implants on this website here. http://occupytheory.org/list-of-pros-and-cons-of-cochlear-implants/ Before reading the article I was unaware of what cochlear implants were. A cochlear implant is an electronic device that is surgically implanted within the ear and the ear canal that helps the ear register sounds for people with severe or worsening hearing loss. Though the cochlear implant can not give you 100% of your hearing back, it can register sounds and the ability to understand and hear the majority of something. There is a lot of advantages of the cochlear implants as well as some disadvantages. The advantages include: regaining hearing, more opportunities and is safer. The main advantage of the cochlear implant is the relief of regaining some or most of your hearing ability. You will have a more functioning and be able to understand and communicate a lot better than before the implant. The opportunities are endless when you can hear again. You may feel as if the world is a new place and are much more happy with yourself. You're opportunities open up in groups and schools and many others. While the advantages may make someone get the cochlear implants there still is some disadvantages that can make you rethink getting the procedure done. Any surgery of course has it's risks, this procedure can be a very long healing process and could may even cause more complications. Some other side affects that may happen after the procedure result in muscle spasms, numbness of the surgical site, and occasional facial numbness or minor facial paralysis. The cost of the cochlear implants can also be a problem for some. Some insurances may not cover the procedure and that leaves people disappointed and still with the hearing loss. To most people the procedure may be worth it, but it is important to look at everything about the procedure before going through with it.
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Genneria Purrier on Friday, December 02, 2016 1:11 PM
Wow, I never knew of the risks of the Cochlear Implant, but your article gave me insight. Muscle spasms and/or paralysis sounds like a huge con to me! I'd like to research someone who actually experience those outcomes after their surgery. I wonder if they knew of the risks and if they value their new ability to hear, more or less than their new muscles shortcomings.


Victoria Dias on Saturday, November 26, 2016 7:53 PM
There are many pros and cons with the usage of Cochlear Implants. Cochlear implants are surgically implanted in someone's ear so that they can help someone with a hearing disability hear. To learn more about cochlear implants I read the article on http://www.cochlear.com/wps/wcm/connect/us/ci-landing-page/index.html?utm_campaign=Cochlear_Brand&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term=cochlear%20implant&utm_content=cochlear_brand&gclid=CLn-vf7Ix9ACFUlLDQodRq8LOg Cochlear implants help those with severe to profound hearing loss in both ears who are not receiving enough benefit when using hearing aids. I found this article interesting and helpfully to leaning about the implants because it showed the steps you go through to see how and if you need them. It informs you on the different choices you have for the implants. I liked how it showed the difference it makes in nosier environments compared to hearing aids. It was interesting to see what others had to share after experiences with using them.
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Chyanne Guyton on Saturday, November 26, 2016 11:41 PM
The cochlear impact is a device I have seen on many people but I never quite understood what it was used for. I read through the attached article and soon found out the device attached to the ear is the speech processor while the device attached to the head is the processor that sends signals to the implant. The device is used to send signals to the brain in order to generate sound to people who have a damaged inner ear. The pro in this device is it gives people adults and children the chance to hear and communicate with people of the hearing community. I noticed a con in another website "http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/ProductsandMedicalProcedures/ImplantsandProsthetics/CochlearImplants/ucm062843.htm" which explained if life situations such as car accidents, fall, or rough contact with the ear that the implant is placed may result in implant damage. If the implant is damaged the person would need to go into surgery yet again and have it replaced. This con is extremely significant because situations such as falls and car accidents are not easily avoided nor prevented. A more durable implant should be made and tested for such incidents.
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Genneria Purrier on Friday, December 02, 2016 1:25 PM
Another new con that I've learned thanks to your article! I wonder if there's any sort of warranty that comes along with the implant. After putting so much money into the procedure and the time healing, there definitely should be a sure back-up plan. I wonder if there has been a person who experienced complications with their surgery and was allowed a redo of the procedure.


Genneria Purrier on Friday, December 02, 2016 1:56 PM
There's often a war against those who are in favor of something and who want to be heard. In the midst of their protest and goal to be heard, they forget the right of "each one their own" and put themselves above others. But when there's been a misconception, who wouldn't want to set the matter straight? Here's the article I found http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2013/08/understanding-deafness-not-everyone-wants-to-be-fixed/278527/. It speaks of those not in favor of the implant, because they feel it is a "fix" to a problem that they don't see as an actual problem. No pros are apparent in the article. The cons are that the implants devalue the use of ASL and promote lip reading along with oral speech. This article taught me that the majority of deaf people are not in favor of the Cochlear Implant.


Genneria Purrier on Friday, December 02, 2016 1:57 PM
There's often a war against those who are in favor of something and who want to be heard. In the midst of their protest and goal to be heard, they forget the right of "each one their own" and put themselves above others. But when there's been a misconception, who wouldn't want to set the matter straight? Here's the article I found http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2013/08/understanding-deafness-not-everyone-wants-to-be-fixed/278527/. It speaks of those not in favor of the implant, because they feel it is a "fix" to a problem that they don't see as an actual problem. No pros are apparent in the article. The cons are that the implants devalue the use of ASL and promote lip reading along with oral speech. This article taught me that the majority of deaf people are not in favor of the Cochlear Implant.


Genneria Purrier on Friday, December 02, 2016 1:59 PM
Please excuse my second and third replies...


Madison Rix on Sunday, November 27, 2016 12:37 AM
Cochlear implants are electronic medical devices placed in the damaged inner ear which provide sound signals to the brain. Cochlear implants are a lot different from a hearing aid. A hearing aid turns up the volume while a cochlear implant help recognize words and speech. Also sounds. Cochlear implants are related to the cochlea (part of the inner ear) and the nerve endings which is inner ear, behind the ear and internal part. The electronic device (implant) stimulates the nerve endings which provides a sense of sound. A magnet is often used to hold the external system in place next to the implanted internal system. There are both pros and cons of a cochlear implant. To start, some pros are... 1. increase hearing and communication abilities (which is very wonderful for someone to be able to experience hearing) 2. Nerves are being electronically stimulated to send signals to the brain, where it does the rest of the work.3. It is an expanding topic, which means more research and opportunities and discoveries are to come. Cons... 1. Risks are increased health risks, injury to facial nerve, meningitis, perilymph fluid leak, dizziness, or vertigo. 2 Age matter, the younger, the more likely to introduce sounds and hearing earlier. The older, the less benefits.3. There is nothing bad or wrong with being deaf. I know it is a choice for some people who would like hearing restored, but still, it is a beautiful thing to be deaf and experience life in a different way. All and all, I personally take the side of not getting cochlear implants. I understand the research and the good in it but I really do not find anything wrong with being deaf. My opinions are based primarily on my morals and my religion. The research makes sense but I think it is a beautiful thing to be deaf. The world is viewed in a completely different way.
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Felicia Verville on Sunday, November 27, 2016 12:46 AM
I find it super interesting how cochlear implants and hearing aids, in a way, is so different from each other! I knew that these implants would improve the ability to hear, but I didn't know that these implants recognize words and speech! I also found that the younger you are, he more effective he implant will be so personal health means a lot when deciding to get an implanf.


Felicia Verville on Sunday, November 27, 2016 12:42 AM
While doing some research about cochlear implants, I came across the website http://occupytheory.org/list-of-pros-and-cons-of-cochlear-implants/, that really caught my attention. Before reading, I had absolutely no idea what a cochlear implant was. Once I began reading however, I soon realized that cochlear implants are "electronically deceives that are surgically implanted within the ear and the ear canal that helps the ear register sounds for people with light of severe hearing loss." As many devices do, cochlear implants come with pros and cons. With cochlear implants people are guarantee to gain all, if not most of their hearing back, however this also depends on your age and health conditions. It takes adults a longer period of time to adapt to sounds more than children. Along with regaining hearing, this provides a better way of communication. Cochlear implants also cause people to be more safe. People who are able to hear are more aware of dangerous situations such as construction, fire alarms, etc. Although there are many pros to having the ability to hear with cochlear implants, there are also some downsides. Like all surgeries, there is always a risk of something going wrong. "Surgery can also result in muscle spasms, numbness of the surgical site, and occasional facial numbness or minor facial paralysis." Not only that, but electronic conversions may occur which may cause your speech to be slurred. Keep in mind, that these implants will soon need to be replaced and the surgery itself, is already a ton of money. Most insurance companies do not cover much, if not all of the surgery. So getting a cochlear implants is definitely worth some thinking. I knew that the implants would be expensive since it is a surgery, but before reading I had no idea the complications that could come along with it
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Charity Ward on Sunday, November 27, 2016 10:16 PM
Hi Felicia. I liked how you mentioned how cochlear implants can't help people who use it being more safe, instead of just saying that. I didn't know insurance companies didn't cover much for the cost. I think that's not really fair, but I don't know much on how insurance works yet. I didn't know electronic conversions could also occur, I wonder how often that happens in cases.


Robin Fordham on Sunday, November 27, 2016 4:16 PM
I have family in Finland on my mother's side. My cousin's son was born deaf in around 1980. Because we have not traveled to Finland in many years, I do not know much about my cousin's experience. What I do know is that the family all learned sign language, and my cousin was schooled in sign language at a deaf school his whole life. My cousins all speak many languages - Swedish is their native language, they also speak Finnish, and English (and probably more!). I wondered how being a naturally multilingual society would affect their attitudes toward sign language, and the technology of cochlear implants. I found a very interesting article which evaluates a cohort of Finnish children who received cochlear implants when they first became available. (Language choices and the need for interpreting services for deaf children and young people with cochlear implants, Series F, HUMAK Publications, 1799-5655; 13, 2012. https://issuu.com/humak/docs/humak-verkko-raino-cochlear_implants) They were studying this group to better understand how deaf children with cochlear implants and their families use sign language at the time of the implant, during the transition to speech, and after. The researchers were interested in knowing what kind of supports these children would need that might be different from hearing or Deaf children. What they found was that the experience of cochlear implants and the use of sign and verbal speech varied widely, depending on whether the family of origin was also deaf, and at what age the child received the implant. Some children from hearing families with good implant outcomes went on to be exclusive speakers with no reliance on sign (either sign language or sign supported speech). Other families might use sign supported speech to help bridge comprehension when hearing/speech was challenging (they cited the example of noisy places as being more challenging for those with cochlear implants), or they might be a more bilingual household, with the child using both speech and sign language depending on the circumstance. They also noted that for some children, while they would participate fully in the hearing world, speaking and hearing could be very hard work, and depending on the child, the complexity and understanding of language might be deeper when conducted in sign language. The researchers concluded that children with cochlear implants might need a totally new level of support in order to be fully engaged in work and private life. Ordinarily, Deaf children receive support through interpreters, whose job is only to provide interpretation. They found that with some of the children with implants who also used interpreters, that the job of interpreting might need to be expanded to include a more proactive role in alerting educators to delays or deficiencies in spoken language comprehension (noting that these children, because they have implants and can get by, often do not avail themselves fully of the interpreter and support services due to embarrassment or self-consciousness). Before reading this article, I assumed that an implant if done early enough was always a success. This article made clear that there is a wide range of responses to cochlear implantation, and that they outcome has a big effect on the language needs of the child and family. Finland recognizes on an official level that Deaf children's native language is sign language, and they have a legal right to receive all services in their native language. At the same time, they do perform cochlear implants in Finland, and as the article pointed out we are at a point where the first generation of children with very early implants are just coming of age and will be able to begin to tell researchers in their own words what the experience of cochlear implantation is like. Overall, it seems like the Finnish experience is working to understand that deaf vs. cochlear is not an either/or outcome for many children, and that ongoing support of sign language or sign supported speech tailored to the family's needs is essential for the child to fully develop his/her language capacity.
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Eric Carreira on Sunday, November 27, 2016 6:40 PM
Cochlear Implants are a complex and controversial subject. I read several different articles because I realized that no one article can capture the vast array of opinions and perspectives--from the Deaf community, medical community, parents of Deaf children, and the range of opinions within each of these groups. One article I found to be very interesting is titled Understanding Deafness: Not Everyone Wants To be Fixed which you can find here:
http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2013/08/understanding-deafness-not-everyone-wants-to-be-fixed/278527/
The article is based around a protest by a group of Deaf people at a language symposium held by AGB, the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. AGB promotes and advocates for cochlear implants and oralism over ASL. The author points out that
"The debate stems from a fundamental disagreement: one group sees deafness as a disability, and the other group sees it as a culture. The trouble is that the former group holds a disproportionate amount of power, and the latter group are the ones affected."
In regards to holding power, the article talks about how the manufacturers of these devices profit greatly from CI's, whose prohibitive costs range from $50,000-$100,000. One Deaf woman interviewed for this article states "they are using the ears and the bodies of Deaf people to make themselves rich." The words of another man, who is proudly 6th-generation Deaf, really stood out:
“My whole life I’ve lived as a Deaf person. I married a Deaf person, I’ve worked and associated with Deaf people, and I’ve had no problem in this world. So why are organizations like this trying to take away my right to live the way I want to live, my right to raise my children the way I feel they should be raised?”
Since I am neither Deaf, nor the parent of a Deaf child nor part of the medical community, I understand that my personal opinion matters little. Everyone is entitled to make their own choices to maximize their own happiness and well-being. This of course applies to parents and the life they want for their child. However I will state that if I were Deaf or the parent of a Deaf child, I would not choose cochlear implants. There are many concerns I would have, including medical risks according to the FDA:
http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/ProductsandMedicalProcedures/ImplantsandProsthetics/CochlearImplants/ucm062843.htm
One of things I've learned in ASL 101 this semester is how rich and beautiful Deaf culture truly is. Some in the medical community view deafness as a disability or something that needs to be fixed. My personal belief is that it is's not Deaf people that need to be changed or fixed, but rather it is society and its views on Deafness and Deaf people that needs fixing. The community of Rochester, NY, for example, should serve as a model for us all on how hearing people can become more understanding of Deaf Culture, how we can make our society evolve and be more accessible and inviting for Deaf people, and have the hearing and Deaf communities more seamlessly and harmoniously integrated.
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Anjouli Gonzalez on Friday, December 02, 2016 2:13 PM
I completely agree with you. I too have found the Community of Deaf to be very beautiful and moving. Their communication, as well as how together they are is far more better and selfless than that of the hearing world. I also agree that societies labels of those who need to be "fixed" is disgusting. Whether we are Deaf or hearing, we should never have to feel the need to be fixed with the expense of a company or companies that have developed a system to "better our lives."


Jannette Rivera Vega on Sunday, November 27, 2016 7:51 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0y21xxfctfo&t=3087s While watching this video you can learn and understand how Cochlear Implants can have pros and cons. I decided to focus in lives experiences and this video is the perfect example of it. In this video, they apparently wrote a book about their respective experiences with the implant. Some of them oh most of them were satisfied with the results obtained with the cochlear implant and have used it as part of your daily life. Others despite having had successful results they still think that it should be a personal decision for each individual for example: in children, for their opinion we should let them grow up in the deaf culture until they decide if they want to get the operation, on the other side there were those who said that they should try everything for their children without leaving the deaf culture to one side. As part of the video parents spoke with different points of view but the one that caught my attention was the mother of a girl named Isabella who received the implant at the age of two and a half. His mother expresses that they tried everything before getting to operate his daughter, and when decided to to operate their little girl it was not something nice but horrendous for them. Isabella comes from a hearing family and even though they were learning sign language they wanted her to reach them halfway. To make the story short and get you guys excited to see the video Isabella had complications with her implant and at the moment refuses to use it. This video shows so many different expiriences values and option for those who has no idea what to do if this situation comes to our lifes.
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Eric Carreira on Sunday, November 27, 2016 9:35 PM
Hi Jannette. This is a great video, thank you for posting. This is better than anything I've seen or read so far. Admittedly, I came into this with a somewhat negative opinion of cochlear implants. And while I haven't watched all of it yet (I plan to!) what I've heard in this video so far is very moving. It's wonderful to see this panel assembled and learn from Deaf people who have actually lived with cochlear implants, some of them for decades. It's also very interested that the panelists have all contributed to a book of essays called New Beginnings: Acquiring and Living with a Cochlear Implant which I'm sure would be a great read. It's very helpful to learn about the positive experiences some people have had with implants. In particular, I was moved by Kelly Kim (the third panelist,) who said even though he no longer uses his implant, he still views it as a very positive experience in his life. The range of experiences, unique points of view and all the different ways the panelist use and relate to their implants is fascinating. Learning directly from people who are living their lives with implants has helped to shape and enrich my opinion on this very complex and controversial subject affecting the lives of Deaf people and their families. For me, I think the bottom line is what Kelly Kim said, that "whether a person has an implant or doesn't, your life is going to be terrific one way or the other." I love his optimism! The point is that we all born into different circumstances, have different experiences and make different decisions. At the end of the day, what matters is that we make the most of our lives and our experiences.


Eric Carreira on Sunday, November 27, 2016 10:07 PM
I'd like to share this quote from Marlee Matlin, the Academy Award winning actress from Children of a Lesser God. She said:
“If I were offered a cochlear implant today, I would prefer not to have one, but that’s not a statement about hearing aids or cochlear implants. It’s about who you are."
I think this is a really profound statement to think about as we discuss cochlear implants. I interpret her words as a reminder that a cochlear implant or lack thereof does not define a person. We always have to go beyond such distinctions and try to see each individual as the unique person that we really are.
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Jennifer Gonzalez-Morales on Sunday, November 27, 2016 10:59 PM
Eric; When I first saw this assignment on moddle the first thing that came to my mind was that Cochlear implants are not for all the deaf people and that it depended if the deaf person consider himself deaf with "d" or "D". Not because the person is deaf means that he/she automatically needs cochlear implants, some deaf people rather hear and other wants to stay the way the are. Some have accepted themselves for who they are and they love who the are. Marleen Matlin accepted herself for who she was and she was happy with herself. She defined her herself as a Deaf person and she did not want to change anything about it. Like you said everyone is a unique person and should be treat individual and not seen as a whole.


Beth Phillips on Sunday, November 27, 2016 10:17 PM
I chose the article, Understanding Deafness: Not Everyone Wants to Be 'Fixed'. The article talked about the Alexander Graham Bell Association, and a current protest done by members of the deaf community. The AGBA hosts conventions that promote device hearing and actual communication through voice. As a member of the hard of hearing community I found the article to be unsettling at best. The AGBA focus 'is on everyone being able to communicate. I work for a major retailer and am quite often put inn positions to sign with customers due to the fact none of my co workers sign. I respect the daily struggle of the members of the deaf community but find it so hard to watch them try to communicate with people who just don't understand. If you are brought up in the deaf culture, you sign or use tools to communicate with people within the community. By no means am I suggesting that people change to communicate with others when full and well it should be everyone's responsibility to find ways to communicate. The cochlear implant requires surgery and can often be discouraging with the device does not function as well as the should. I believe it should be up to the individual to make these choices due to accept the risk. Family support is key in success for both the implant and choosing to go without. If the family communicates in ASL then they should continue to go on using it.
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Jennifer Gonzalez-Morales on Sunday, November 27, 2016 10:44 PM
Madeline; You are right in the sense that you are incorrect. Not all deaf children learn ASL. I learned in my Intro to Deaf class that 90% of the deaf children are born to hearing parents and the other 10% to deaf parents. If the hearing parents do not know anything about deaf culture and ASL they are most likely to follow the advice that doctors (who do not know about deaf culture) give to them.
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Jennifer Gonzalez-Morales on Sunday, November 27, 2016 10:53 PM
I came across this article http://www.fda.gov/MedicalDevices/ProductsandMedicalProcedures/ImplantsandProsthetics/CochlearImplants/ucm062843.htm and it talks about the risk and benefits of Cochlear Implants. Cochlear Implants only benefit those who wants to make money. Cochlear implants do not fix deaf people, do not give deaf people the 100% hearing or return anyone's hearing. Deaf people do not want to be fix, Deaf people want to be treat normal. They are normal people just like hearing people the only difference is that they communicate with ASL instead English. Deaf people have been oppress and isolated. The hearing world wants to extinct the Deaf culture with their invents and their must. Deaf people can take care of themselves and survive in a hearing world. They are already doing it there is no need for Cochlear Implants to survive in Earth.
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Samantha Michaelson on Saturday, December 03, 2016 12:54 AM
ASL is an extremely effective mode of communication among people who not it. CI are good for deaf people who don't want to learn ASL and who want to be more hearing minded. However ASL is effective to use and deaf people have the rights in an interrupter. Doctors should not force parents to fix there deaf child because the culture believes deafness is not a disabiliy at all.


Genneria Purrier on Friday, December 02, 2016 1:58 PM
There's often a war against those who are in favor of something and who want to be heard. In the midst of their protest and goal to be heard, they forget the right of "each one their own" and put themselves above others. But when there's been a misconception, who wouldn't want to set the matter straight? Here's the article I found http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2013/08/understanding-deafness-not-everyone-wants-to-be-fixed/278527/. It speaks of those not in favor of the implant, because they feel it is a "fix" to a problem that they don't see as an actual problem. No pros are apparent in the article. The cons are that the implants devalue the use of ASL and promote lip reading along with oral speech. This article taught me that the majority of deaf people are not in favor of the Cochlear Implant.
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Darlene Aresco on Saturday, December 03, 2016 11:15 AM
I do agree with you that majority of the Deaf community view cochlear implants in a negative light. I like the point that you brought up about losing the language of ASL. I think that if everyone who is Deaf had the operation, ASL would become nonexistent and that would be a shame. ASL is such a beautiful nonverbal way of communication and it would be a loss if the language ended up not being used anymore because of the cochlear implant.


Michelle Liaszenik on Saturday, December 03, 2016 2:35 PM
I absolutely understand why they would feel that way. If this were a procedure that was more common to people later in age than their toddler and preschool years, then it may not be such a hot button issue. I feel like the bigger issue here is that so many Deaf and Hard of Hearing children are not given the choice, because their parents don't want to put in the effort to embrace a new culture. I am a firm supporter of ASL being an early childhood learning requirement to try and reduce that stigma, and take some of the communication burden off of our Deaf brothers and sisters. We are all humans, shouldn't the ability to communicate fall on all of us?


Anjouli Gonzalez on Friday, December 02, 2016 2:04 PM
The view of Cochlear implants has been a very controversial subject. A good handful of people have found it to be negative, why? Well,some people feel that there is nothing wrong being deaf, that there is generally absolutely nothing wrong. On the other hand, it is viewed as helpful, beneficial in a sense of participating in high contact or heavy social activities. So with this said what are a few of pros and cons to a cochlear implant? After reading quite a few articles I have found that the following lists are general yet useful facts to keep in consideration. pros:Relief and regain of hearing -Better opportunities -safer(in terms of surroundings and activities around a person) Cons: Maintenance -surgical risks and possible complications -physical activity limitation -Costs (of course) For my article, it hardly talked about the cons of a cochlear implant but focused more on the pros. Granted being able to communicate in the hearing world can be good, but being part the Deaf community is just as good, if not more beautiful than that of the hearing. For my decision, I have chosen nae to the cochlear implants. Why? Our world we live in always calls physical obstacles "abnormalities" or "deformities." We as people strive to fit in with everyone else and to be part of the norm, but when we try to "fix" ourselves because we want to be seen as normal is when we give into the words "abnormality" or "deformed." Whether we can hear or we are Deaf being "fixed" should never be an option, embracing and looking at the positive of what we are given in life can help us to see the beauty in our diversity, and to others that do not understand, we will explain, and it will help them to see the beauty in our diversity as well.
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Samantha Michelson on Saturday, December 03, 2016 12:50 AM
I completely agree with your comment. diversity is important and although CI are good to be a part of the hearing world, its important for deaf people to understand how the deaf world works as well. I think your post was stop on!


Darlene Aresco on Saturday, December 03, 2016 11:03 AM
I think that you bring up a good point about the whole fitting into societies view of being "normal". Who is to say what is normal and what is not? Those that are Deaf can do the exact same things that us hearing people can do, so why consider it a disability? The strain of communication between the hearing and Deaf is just like someone that speaks French and another that speaks Chinese. They both would have a hard time communicating with one another, but that does not define them as being disabled. They just have to find a different means of communication that fits both of them, which is exactly what Deaf and hearing people have to do.


Samantha Michaelson on Saturday, December 03, 2016 12:43 AM
After reading this article, I learned some very useful information. The cochlear implant is a debate that should be taken very seriously. The article is about the perspective of the deaf world and hearing world on cochlear implants. Doctors feel the need to do there job and "fix" the problem of being deaf. Deaf children and there hearing parents should be educated on the culture and different communication methods. parents should learn ASL and teach there children ASL before doctors convince them they should get cochlear implants and give them an oral education. Some pros of learning oral skills and having CI is it was be easy to adjust to the hearing world. Depending of the child, some deaf children are very successful with CI and oral skills. On the down side, some deaf children don't do good with oral skills. Some deaf children want to be in the culture and learn more about it. Parents don't understand how tight the culture is and how they don't believe deafness is a disability. Parents need to search all there options and understand all the effects they will have on there son or daughter. Rather then "fix" the problem, parents should learn a shared and effective method of communication for there children.
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Samantha Michaelson on Saturday, December 03, 2016 12:47 AM
http://eds.a.ebscohost.com.ezst.ez.cwmars.org:4800/eds/detail/detail?sid=2687800c-6ba0-45bf-a972-335edde323cc%40sessionmgr4006&vid=0&hid=4110&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWRzLWxpdmU%3d#AN=107243856&db=c8h


Anjouli Gonzalez on Saturday, December 03, 2016 10:29 AM
I enjoyed your post because as when it comes to children being deaf parents play a big role in terms of communication, and it relies on them to make an effort to either learn a language and a culture or "adjust" their child to a way that is more beneficial to them. Granted, having a CI does have its pros in the family circle, but if no one considers giving ASL a chance then this is where the word "fix" will come into play. I really enjoyed your comment and your article.


octavia kenney on Saturday, December 03, 2016 6:12 PM
Sam I totally agree with your post. I feel like parents and any family members need to look into and get all the information before just implanting their child. They should learn about the culture and learn signing and everything about the implant like complications and risks.


Tea Kenney on Saturday, December 03, 2016 7:30 PM
Sam this is really eye opening. It does make a lot of sense that a parent should accept their child for who they are instead of trying to fix them. They should embrace their Deaf Culture and learn about sign Language so they can teach their child and keep them a part of the Deaf Community.


Darlene Aresco on Saturday, December 03, 2016 10:52 AM
I watched a video on youtube that had deaf people, hearing people and those that received the cochlear implant. I thought it was interesting that the older generation of Deaf people still oppose the cochlear implant because it is a body modification and they do not see their self as needing it. It does talk about the hardships that Deaf people face because they are Deaf. They often have to write down what they want to say when in contact with those who are hearing or often have to signal to them that they are Deaf a couple of times before a hearing person really understands what they are trying to convey. I do not think that my stand point on cochlear implants has changed after watching this because I feel as though being Deaf may cause people to have to work a little harder to communicate with others but that is not something that cannot be done. I believe that it should be up to the person that is Deaf as to whether or not they would like to receive a cochlear implant. There are many risks to having that surgery just like any other procedure. They also have to deal with the postoperative recovery of that as well. That alone can be very scary for anyone not to mention a child. I believe that if a child is born Deaf, instead of going straight to the cochlear implant option try to emerge themselves in the Deaf community and get a sense of what life would really be like for someone that is Deaf. Why not learn some ASL and teach the child to sign. The cochlear implant option is always going to be there for the child, so putting it off for a bit would not be too bad until someone really gains all the knowledge of the Deaf community and their everyday life. It should be up to the person that will be having the surgery as to whether or not they want to receive the cochlear implant. If a child is born Deaf the parents should emerge them in both the Deaf and hearing community and when the child is old enough to understand it all, then they can make the choice. However that is just my opinion. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7g-gFR8JaGA
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Michelle Liaszenik on Saturday, December 03, 2016 2:23 PM
Darlene, I feel the exact same way. Any kind of elective surgery should be decided on by the person RECEIVING the surgery. It is the responsibility of the parents in this situation to at least attempt to pursue less invasive methods of communicating with their children. I can truthfully say that if it were my children (and I had a period of time when our pediatrician thought that my son may be hard of hearing - turns out he just doesn't care to listen) I would do my best to make sure that when they were ready they would be able to make an informed decision on their own.


Tea Kenney on Saturday, December 03, 2016 7:23 PM
This definitely changed my views on Cochlear implants for children. Now that you mention it I see how it can be very scary for a young child to get surgery done at all and it makes it even scarier because it is on their head. And also the recovery time is a downside to the implants that I didn't see before.


Sarah Tuttle on Monday, December 05, 2016 4:08 PM
i agree if the surgery is not needed then it should be deiced by the person that is getting it.


Michelle Liaszenik on Saturday, December 03, 2016 2:11 PM
I am a singer and pianist. I love music, of all kinds, and could not imagine my life without it. So when I began researching what music would sound like through a cochlear implant, my initial thought was that were I to lose my hearing today, I would be asking about a cochlear implant tomorrow. After reading the article "Deaf Jam: Experiencing Music Through a Cochlear Implant" ( http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2015/05/18/406838781/deaf-jam-experiencing-music-through-a-cochlear-implant ) I can say that my opinion has changed. As it turns out, I would rather have the memories of all of the music that I have played, sang, and listened to than have to resolve how different it would sound through a device that is incapable of translating the nuances of pitch and tone. Professor Les Atlas, an electrical engineer, is working on software that will help to improve tone and pitch differentiation to help those with cochlear implants hear high tonal languages, such as Mandarin and Vietnamese, be able to pick out one voice in a room of voices, and help to experience music in a richer manner.
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octavia kenney on Saturday, December 03, 2016 6:16 PM
I never knew that things sounded different through the implant than it would normally. Knowing that would change my opinion on it if I were ask into music and singing as you are. But knowing this would make me think about and consider everything more if I were to lose my hearing today.


octavia kenney on Saturday, December 03, 2016 5:57 PM
Some of the positive outcomes of getting a CI is that it will help the person hear better but not fully recover all of their hearing. It also depends on the age of the person how effective the implant will be. After receiving the implant it will help you hear better and help with having better conversation and communication. There is a greater advantage to the younger people that get it as it can help it social groups and schools. They will still know that they are deaf and they could choose to have the implant and still learn ASL, it would give more options as they could go to a deaf or a hearing school. Some cons to getting a CI is that there could be some complications in the surgery or the body of the person getting the implant could reject it or it wouldn't work properly in their ears. Any complications could lead to more surgery or more damage to the ear. If an older adult were to get an implant it would be less effective as the already grew up being deaf and their brains might not fully understand the signals coming from the implant. There could also be physical limitations like getting it wet or if the person played a sport it may interfere with that also. If it were to get wet it could damage or cause complications with the implant. It is also expensive to get and if it does get broken or damaged it is expensive to repair. You would also have to keep up with the maintenance of it and have the wires worked on.
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Tea Kenney on Saturday, December 03, 2016 7:11 PM
I find it interesting that cochlear implants were approved first for adults in 1985 then children in 1990 because all I see today is that it is easier for a child to learn English than it is for an adult. I also find it strange that there were restrictions back then as to who was allowed to get the implants. Studies show that younger children have a better chance of learning language skills than older children because they will be learning at the same rate as their peers. I think that children as young as twelve months, if able, should get the implants to be able to communicate with their peers and to start learning to speak and listen as early as possible. I also think that they should still learn sign language so they will still be involved with the Deaf Community. I think it would be harder for an adult to get implants. The reason is that they don’t have all of the same assets as a child has such as a classroom, a teacher, and their parents. Overall I think that it is a good idea for younger kids to get the implants because they will have an easier time learning to speak English. I don’t think it’s a good idea for adults to get implants because they will have a harder time adapting to the hearing world because they have been using ASL for their entire life.
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Ayshia Gollman on Monday, December 05, 2016 12:26 AM
I did not know CI dated back that far but I completely agree with how you feel about adults receiving coacher implants.


Kathleen Musiak on Tuesday, December 06, 2016 6:32 PM
As a deaf CI patient with multiple "corrective" surgeries i have to disagree with you, getting the implant when young can make it really difficult to make it well in the Deaf community as it is a close knitted group and many Deaf people believe it is disrespectful to the culture to have a CI because it takes away a sort of Deaf belonging. As a child i had many friends who were deaf that i lost because of my families decision to correct my hearing. also the CI surgery as well as others i had in attempt to "fix" my hearing were terrifying experiences as a Deaf child because i didn't know or under stand what was going on. i think an appropriate age to decide would be 10-13Years old although it might take longer to learn to speak, and to adjust at that age it is also a more knowledgeable decision and ALOT more fair to the child.


Amanda Perdomo on Sunday, December 04, 2016 12:03 PM
In my readings of the pros and cons of cochlear implants i was surprised to find that there were a few more cons then pros. some of the advantages of getting surgery for cochlear implants included relief from hearing loss and excellent chances of regaining hearing that can result in better communication and a more functioning and a fulfilling life given better opportunities in education (for youth) in social groups and in broadening career choices. cochlear implants are found to be safer for dangerous situations everyone may encounter such as construction sites and vehicular accidents. and like any other surgical life changing procedure, doctors must take into consideration the age, past and current health, the cause and amount of hearing loss of each candidate. as for the cons of cochlear implants there can be complications and surgical risks (again, like any other life changing surgical procedure) such as medical conditions prior to surgery that may hinder the healing process or cause more complications, side effects after the surgery could include muscle spasms, numbness of the surgical site, occasional facial numbness or even minor facial paralysis. electronic conversion is also a con, mainly in older adults who get the surgery- they can have temporary or permanent electronic conversion complications in the brain which is not painful (so it says) where electronic signals might not register fully and some speech/ hearing hindrance occurs. another con has to do with physical sports and activities involving high contact or water, cochlear implants do not allow people to participate in these. maintenance is required for the implants, like battery changing, wire replacement and the remapping of the processor. some of which may need actual replacing which brings me to the final and most impacting con, the costs. Costs of cochlear implants go for thousands of dollars and most insurance companies do not cover much (if any) of the expenses for a few reasons like, they see it as a chosen surgery as if it was a cosmetic process only to better ones self, but most insurance companies are found to more likely work with children because they have their lives ahead of them. after reading all of this i understand the advantages and disadvantages/ risks, but in my opinion cochlear implants are a choice and can better anyone's life if they do not see a future where they can be deaf and successful. i think it might be worth the risks because i found on google that up to 90 percent of patients improve in hearing because of the surgery.
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Ayshia Gollman on Monday, December 05, 2016 12:22 AM
I found your response to be very interesting the information you found about CI was great to read.


Ayshia Gollman on Monday, December 05, 2016 12:12 AM
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=7g-gFR8JaGA I watch a documentary about the pros and cons of CI based on the opinions of those who already have them and those who plan on getting them. Many of the stories that are told in the video are by people who are eager to get CI and how it will change their lives.
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Sarah Tuttle on Monday, December 05, 2016 4:12 PM
I agree that it would change their lives. I also believe that it would make their lives a little easier then it would be without the implants


Kathleen Musiak on Tuesday, December 06, 2016 6:23 PM
I have a CI and do not agree with this, most of the time when a person receives a CI they are too young to make the decision. iF they are older know the risks, and have gotten to experience both sides its one thing. But personally i wish my family had waited until i was older to start trying to "fix" my hearing (i was 6 when i had my first surgery and it was quite traumatizing in the long run). when i was 13 and was fully aware of what i was doing i got a type of Implant that worked for me, but having the surgery when i was young was not only terrifying but it kept me from having relationships with alot of other children at my school for the deaf.


Sarah Tuttle on Monday, December 05, 2016 3:56 PM
CI’s are important because they give people who are deaf a chance at hearing. CI’s are the only devices that can return one of the senses. CI’s like many things have both pros and cons. The system consists of two parts. The first par is an audio processer and the second is an internal cochlear implant. The internal implant is put in via surgery. One pro of these implants is that it will allow some people to hear. Some cons of these implants is that it is that it could take a long time to recover from the surgery.
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Sarah Tuttle on Monday, December 05, 2016 3:57 PM
CI’s are important because they give people who are deaf a chance at hearing. CI’s are the only devices that can return one of the senses. CI’s like many things have both pros and cons. The system consists of two parts. The first par is an audio processor and the second is an internal cochlear implant. The internal implant is put in via surgery. One pro of these implants is that it will allow some people to hear. Some cons of these implants is that it is that it could take a long time to recover from the surgery.
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kathleen Musiak on Tuesday, December 06, 2016 6:18 PM
I was born Deaf, and now have the Cochlear Baha that helps me to hear. I have debated within myself many times how I feel about using Cochlears in children who are Deaf or HOH. As i had many corrective surgeries not only the implants but many hearing aids, and received the implant late in life I experienced a sort of "exile" from the Deaf community when I chose to get them. I am using that term lightly but i lost a few friends who believed i was leaving behind my culture. There are many plus sides to my CI, i can now hear music better than i have for most of my life which is amazing, and i can pay better attention in classes but i also feel as though i lost a part of my identity. I read the article here - http://www.cbsnews.com/news/the-cochlear-implant-controversy/ about the diffrent sides to CI's and most of all i found it interesting that there is no information out there that i can find about my side, how i think there are both positives and negatives. Above all i think that the desicion to get a CI or other hearing device should be made by someone who is old enough to make the decision on their own (thirteen) being the age i chose my latest. medically it is best to get them young and adjust, but at the end of the day its worse on the child mentally in the long run if they do not make the choice on their own.
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Anthony Santiago on Sunday, February 05, 2017 2:24 PM
Hi Kathleen, on my own experiences with people who are deaf is being different. I have parent of a child who was born deaf. Besides their own Believe on waiting for a miracle; the parents did an intense research and debated among the family to whether or not to get it done. Pretty much they decided to get the CI's done but they waited until this particular person was old enough to express his/her opinion about the surgery. Although, it wasn't 13 years old, it was younger than that; the individual ended up getting the CI done. Now, so far the experience hasn't being great as we thought it was going to be, but the individual is happy. The individual has increase awareness on her/his surroundings, when someone is bugging this individual all she/he does is take them off. In other words the individual feels comfortable with her lifestyle. The reason I decided to learn more about ASL was influence by this individual. At the end of the day she/he is just as normal as anybody else. Encouragement and support comes from everyone in this family because its a culture thing to do among them. Also, this would be my third language, since I speak/read/write English and Spanish, but Spanish is my first language. In my own opinion and I quoted, "The structure of Sign language makes this language unique" I can wait to learn how to sign and have a better understanding of this particular culture. We all Equal.


Ainsley Murdock on Tuesday, December 13, 2016 12:41 AM
I have two friends with this implant. I think that it is such an amazing tool for those who wish to invest in it. I don't believe children should be forced to have it at a young age, rather I believe that once they are a little older they should be able to make the decision for themselves.
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Ivelianisse Morales on Friday, January 27, 2017 9:36 PM
I have two friends who are Deaf and have CIs. They got the Ci when they were young because their family is all hearing and well it would be easier for the family. The parents still put them in a Deaf school so they learned ASL and so did the family. However, having the CI one can say protected them and facilitated their life in a hearing community. But that's not fair. ASL is like any foreign language. We should just make them assimilate and learn English. How about we put off our part and learn a bit of ASL. Have patience and let them express their thoughts be it by signing, finger spelling, or writing it down. I agree it should be a choice for the Deaf person to make, those around should make an effort and not isolate them for being fluent in another language.


Brenda Rosario on Saturday, February 04, 2017 5:51 PM
Learning about the Cochlear Implants. The pros and cons of this implants is to take in consideration. Reading your post help a lot to understand some of the risk that this implants will bring in someone's life. There are good reasons to have them done, especially for those that want to hear sounds or want to make a called. As I keep reading notices that the complications are long term, like have nerves facial problems, not able to have certain X-ray procedure done as MRI, being in a fly could change the waves of the sounds in these implants. More studied needs to made for the better of this community, due to I have seeing many of our young kids with this implant and would like to understand that this will help them in their life style and personal goals that they will follow. Not the negative part of complications that this could bring with health. Really exited to learn more about this procedure.
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