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Brenda Rosario on Friday, January 27, 2017 12:23 PM
Brenda Rosario, January 27 2017. Time:11:09 am. Hi Everyone, This is my first time learning about (ASL) American Sign Language. I started by trying to understand and informed myself when did this culture was discovered and how they got help. Well; (NAD) National Association of the Deaf, is an organization that it was established in 1880. At that time there were leaders that believed in the right of the American deaf community. They help this community to expand in all levels in their life; taking the responsibility of being their advocators and voices. Also, this is an nonprofit organization that has grown world wide and has been supported by donors and organization that understand the important that is to be able to express yourself in different ways. If you would like to know more of this organization this is the website to go to www.nad.org.
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Dalimar Romero on Friday, January 27, 2017 5:43 PM
Brenda, the NAD is an amazing organisation. I remember seeing in a documentary that one of its presents was involved in the Deaf President Now Protest. I can't recall his name, but he encouraged the students and other faculty to stand strong and wait till all the demands were meet. It will keep on helping the Deaf Community.


kayla brodeur on Friday, January 27, 2017 9:12 PM
It is amazing to see such a group come together to help those in the deaf community. It is important to have people on your side, guiding you in any way possible. It is especially important to have people helping guide you through life and its obstacles when there are so little resources to help you. It is amazing to see this organization expand so greatly. It is even more amazing to see so many other organizations coming together to support the deaf community as well.


Dalimar Romero on Friday, January 27, 2017 5:37 PM
Ebisu, the Shinto god of fishermen, merchants and wealth A Japanese myth In Japanese culture, they worship not one God, but many gods and goddesses. Ebisu is considered a leech baby because he had no bones and was created by doing the creation ritual wrong (Goddess Izanami and God Izanagi walk around some pillars and apparently Izanami waves at Izanagi first. Thus creating a leech baby, Ebisu). It is said that his parents sent him away , never to see him again. What does this have to do with being deaf or deaf anything? Ebisu had no bones, and despite hhis really big ears, he was deaf. I found this myth interesting because it was the first myth i found that had to do with deafness. and plus, that means that there is a deaf God in Japan. Pretty coo.
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Dalimar Romero on Friday, January 27, 2017 5:57 PM
I forgot to put the website where i found the myth in my post, So here it is.


Cynthia Rivera on Friday, February 03, 2017 10:57 PM
It so interesting how the Japanese culture believed in a deaf god.I never a heard about a deaf god.I think if they worshiped a deaf god, they most of valued deaf people. I wonder what other cultures have deaf gods. Thanks for researching such a cool article.


Ivelianisse Morales on Monday, February 06, 2017 10:20 AM
This is one of those things you didn't know you needed. I hadn't even considered a deaf god.It is really cool and it helps with the belief that being deaf isn't an impairment because hey a god is deaf too. Not only that but it reminds us that there are many different sign languages not just American or European, the deaf community is a lot bigger than one tends to think.Thank you for sharing.


Francisco Garcia on Friday, January 27, 2017 6:02 PM
The article I found is on Deaf Culture. This is the most important part of learning ASL. You would need to know the culture to be able to understand it. Deaf Culture was first actually recognized in 1965. The culture of the Deaf consists of a few important values: language, speech, socializing and literature. ASL is their natural language which is their way of communicating. Not speaking is extremely valued in Deaf culture. Socializing is an important value of Deaf culture because there are so few Deaf people in an area, social lives are vital. Deaf children learn how to fit in with Deaf culture from positive and negative feedback about behaviors and from the stories and literature that are passed down through the generations. What was interesting about this short article was that I was able to know a little about the Deaf culture. The video at the end of the article was informational also. It took a deeper look into Deaf culture and how it related to society’s need to “cure” deafness. I included the link at the bottom if anyone wants to view it. https://youtu.be/Wi-bzhKWrt0
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Dalimar Romero on Friday, January 27, 2017 6:59 PM
Deaf culture is one of the few cultures that require closeness. If you notice, moat Deaf people will know each other because of how small the communitis are. It's pretty amazing. Most deaf people go to Gallaudet which is a major role in knowing so many peoplr with whom they can relate to.


Ivelianisse Morales on Friday, January 27, 2017 9:16 PM
You brought up a really good point! The hearing community usually see deafness as a condition or something to be cured while the Deaf community don't see themselves as sick or suffering from something that needs to be fixed. I believe we should see Deaf and ASL as another culture that has another language and not as an imperfection.


Ivelianisse Morales on Friday, January 27, 2017 8:42 PM
I searched the world wide web and decided to click on a newspaper article. The Huffington Post had a large variety of articles. Today in class we had spoken about lip reading and this article was about that so it caught my interest. why not , and wow I'm glad i did. I recommend you all watch the video. try not to read the subtitles. Try to read their lips. I could not. very few words did I pick up. How did hearing people ever assume that Deaf could read lips? It's so difficult. Nearly impossible to actually have a conversation.Really made me understand and appreciate the Deaf community so much more.
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kayla brodeur on Friday, January 27, 2017 9:04 PM
To me, this is such a powerful video. I always imagined what it would be like to live in a world of no hearing, and the video gave a perfect example of just that. I could not decipher not one world that was said throughout the video of silence. It is truly amazing how watching one video can open your eyes to many different understandings and wows.


Sara Beltran on Saturday, January 28, 2017 3:50 PM
Wow what a powerful video. This reminds me of a book I read in ASL 1, "Deaf Like Me" by Thomas Spradley. The book is about his Daughter Lynn who is deaf and during her early years she had to practice lipreading and it was such a struggle and after a couple years she was only able to lip read a few words like "ball" "mom," etc. In the end, her parents decided to introduce Lynn to ASL and it changed their world. This just goes to show that while lip reading may work for some people, it is no easy task and ASL is a great way to bridge the gap of communication.


SIGNING Basics on Sunday, January 29, 2017 10:10 PM
The link to the video?


Alicia Parzych on Monday, January 30, 2017 10:25 PM
Great article, and powerful video. The video shows the advantage that hearing people have over someone who is deaf. After watching this video, I have a better understanding of what it's like in their world of silence.


Robin Fordham on Friday, February 03, 2017 6:59 PM
I had not given much thought to the expectation of learning lipreading. Fascinating to learn that it is so challenging (as anyone who watched a TV show with the sound off would know!). In my twenties, I lost some of my hearing for a period of time - my hearing loss was correctable, but until I had a diagnosis and then surgery, I was challenged. I could hear, but understanding language was quite challenging. I noticed at that time that I could no longer understand a conversation without seeing the person's lips. In fact, I was using lipreading to help understand what I was able to hear. You do not have to be entirely deaf to experience a loss of language comprehension! I can see how, without the clue of some sound, understanding language solely by lipreading would be tremendously difficult.


Dalimar Romero on Friday, February 03, 2017 8:27 PM
The hearing world and the deaf world are very different. There are few hearing people who will learn sign language or even acknowledge a deaf person. Going back in time, deaf people would lipread as a way of fitting in to the hearing world. Those few deaf people who were taught to use their voice were sometimes to,d to speak. Sign language was banned in white schools while it was preserved in black schools. I still don't understand why some people are so preserved in their values when it comes to being hearing or being deaf.


Kayla Brodeur on Friday, January 27, 2017 8:54 PM
As I read the title of this article, I wasn't so sure that this was something that I was looking for. But my curiosity got a hold of me and I began to read the article. I realized that reading this article was something that I was totally looking for. I believe that it is important to teach our youth that not everyone is the same, nor do they communicate in the same style. It is not okay to ridicule or call someone out on the way they go about trying to bring conversation to another human being. Just like kids adapt to other people speaking different languages than they do, I think it is equally important to teach our children that there are in fact other ways to communicate besides using language. Our mouths are not the only way we can communicate with people and I think a lot of families forget to send that message out to their young ones. I think that this is a big problem in today's society, where it is unusual for a child to understand why a person is signing, and that is mainly because deaf culture isn't talked about enough in the common household.
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Francisco Garcia on Friday, January 27, 2017 9:52 PM
Your article was a good read. It's important to teach the children of today that not everyone is the same and how they're not able to communicate the same way as us.


Meghan Auclair on Saturday, January 28, 2017 12:52 PM
What I found especially interesting about this article was reading about how the author felt about other people staring at her while she was signing in public. While she's had to adapt to other people watching her conversations, many hearing people are angered or uncomfortable with the idea of another person listening to their conversation.


Cassidy Richter on Thursday, February 02, 2017 12:52 AM
Kyla, I liked your article and it was I feel that it is so true. I agree that we should teach kids about different languages and cultures so that way the learn not to judge others. I was shocked to hear that someone thought it was embarrassing to use ASL in public, that really upset me. Definitely teaching about different cultures and languages at a young age would be beneficial for the future.


Dalimar Romero on Friday, February 03, 2017 8:42 PM
There are some people that are set in their own ways. Some people just do not understand that talking is not the only form of communication. I saw a little girl signing once. She was hearing but her parents where both deaf. She could have been like 6 or 7 years old. I had no idea what the conversation was about but I thought it was fascinating. It peeked my interest. Not everyone who sees someone signing gets intrigued or even cares. It is sad to see that society is so unwelcoming sometimes. Different languages and cultures are always good for young kids. That is how they get to know the world they live in or at least get a glimpse of who different cultures work.


Luz DeJesus on Saturday, February 04, 2017 6:51 PM
I agree that our youth should be introduced to sign language. What inspired me to take sign language was that it was introduced to me in middle school. I think that our youth should experience communicating in a different ways and it will help them understand that there is another way to communicate.


Ivelianisse Morales on Monday, February 06, 2017 10:34 AM
This is such an important topic to bring up. I love deaf culture, recently while babysitting I was doing some homework and watching asl videos. the kids couldn't hold back their laughter, they thought it was so funny how dramatic the facial expressions were or how much they moved. I felt so insulted. I explained to them that using our voices wasn't the only way to communicate and I asked them how would they communicate if they didn't have a voice. Their answer? Be very expressive with their body language so others could understand. Being deaf is not a disability but being ignorant is and we should try to educate more being so that we don't secluded the deaf community which is such a loving and friendly group.


Marina Blanusa on Friday, January 27, 2017 9:09 PM
This article was very interesting to me because it explained how today's society views people with different needs. This is a story of the family whose members are all deaf except the oldest child Kaleb. Kaleb grew up in the deaf community and he does not see deaf people any differently than the hearing people. Kaleb feels that deaf community is closer together than the hearing community. This article also talks about cochlear implants and parents struggles to make a decision whether or not hearing implants are the right thing for their children. Most importantly this article is talking about the significance of sign language and obstacles that deaf people have to overcome throughout their life. Kaleb explains how sign language conversations require eye to eye contact and therefore these conversations are more meaningful. I feel that knowing a sign language is a gift not just for deaf people but for hearing people as well.
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Lexa Leadbetter on Friday, January 27, 2017 9:16 PM
This article was super interesting to read, I really loved how Kaleb shows us that deaf people shouldn't be seen as any different from anyone else. But at the same time, the deaf community has such a rich culture in its self that should be celebrated more often. Thanks for posting it on here!


Francisco Garcia on Friday, January 27, 2017 10:04 PM
This article was very interesting. I completely agree with you when you said "Kaleb feels that deaf community is closer together than the hearing community." They're more together because they're able to understand each other and help each other out.


Meghan Auclair on Saturday, January 28, 2017 12:48 PM
I found an article about new technology in the deaf community which I found interesting. Navid Azodi and Thomas Pryor, two students from the University of Washington, have developed a set of gloves that can translate ASL to spoken english using bluetooth, a central computer, and a speaker. This achievement has even earned them the Lemelson-MIT Student prize and $10,000. They say that the inspiration for this invention, which they have named SignAloud, was in giving those who communicate using ASL a practical method of translation in everyday life. Thomas Pryor describes the gloves as "lightweight, compact and worn on the hands, but ergonomic enough to use as an everyday accessory, similar to hearing aids or contact lenses.” In the article there is a video included which shows a pair of the gloves in action as Pryor uses them to translate while he signs; introducing himself and Azodi as well as the competition they had entered the glove in. I think it would be every interesting if we saw this technology in our everyday life because of the ease it might lend to the deaf community in certain situations while navigating the hearing world. And I think it would also be a plus for people to have the choice to use their own language when doing things like ordering food from a restaurant instead of using notes if desired. If anyone would like to read the article and/or watch the video this is the link: http://www.washington.edu/news/2016/04/12/uw-undergraduate-team-wins-10000-lemelson-mit-student-prize-for-gloves-that-translate-sign-language/


Meghan Auclair on Saturday, January 28, 2017 1:12 PM
It's crazy to see how different life is for a hearing person in a deaf household, and for a deaf person in a hearing household. It still amazes me how so many parents go straight for cochlear implants and teaching lip reading to make their child adapt to their lives instead of learning more about ASL and the community themselves to accommodate their child.


Carlos Valdes on Monday, January 30, 2017 11:01 PM
You're right. It's not a cure or a sickness, it's just another way of communicating. Very good article. I do feel that ASL should be put more into education as well and taught more in the school Just as any other language. It was very interesting to see his point of view and how they view us and vice versa. Especially when he said the conversations are more meaningful because of the eye contact. Amazing article.


Alina Schultz on Monday, January 30, 2017 11:49 PM
I found this article very interesting! I find it intriguing that Kaleb prefers Deaf culture over the hearing world. In this article I learned that there is a large pooulation of deaf people and deaf schools in large cities such as San Francisco, New Year, L.A, and D.C.


Lexa Leadbetter on Friday, January 27, 2017 9:10 PM
Hey guys! I am a nursing student who is very admit about learning American Sign Language to break the barrier between deaf patients and the people who are healing them. I was looking for some new information about deaf culture and I came across this interesting article about a hospital basically refusing to provide an interpreter for deaf or hard of hearing people who use sign language. In this particularly case, Cheylla Silva is the patient who had been refused an interpreter more than once by staff at Baptist Hospital Miami. Instead, the doctors or nurses had her using a Video Remote Interpreting system (VRI) to communicate with her doctors. But these systems crashed frequently and the feed was choppy so it was very hard to understand, especially when in pain or lying down with tubes in her arms all while having information coming from many different people. Finally Cheylla had enough and in 2014 went to federal court to fight that the hospital had violated the Americans with Disabilities Act. There was also another deaf individual, Matthew Dietz who filed the case with her. The court had dismissed the case the following year but the two are appealing it. The hospital claimed that they had done a perfect job at providing deaf patients a way to communicate, and that Silva had gotten an interpreter more often then not during her stays. Dietz pointed out that Baptist Hospital Miami only provided interpreters after VRI had failed to work. Its an interesting read about the specific issues that deaf people face that hearing people don’t realize. Feel free to comment, and heres the link to it. http://www.miamiherald.com/news/health-care/article128778459.html
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Marina Blanusa on Friday, January 27, 2017 10:26 PM
Hi Lexa, Thank you for sharing this article. It is mind bottling to hear that hospitals are refusing interpreters for their sick patients. How can doctors provide proper care to their patients without communicating with them? Isn't being sick enough? I hope this changes and all hospitals have interpreters when needed. You are absolutely right when you said that hearing people have no idea what issues deaf people have to deal with on daily basis. You are absolutely right when you said that hearing people do not realize what issues deaf people have to deal with on daily basis. Now, that I am taking ASL class I am becoming more aware of these issues.


Sara Beltran on Saturday, January 28, 2017 3:58 PM
I recently read the same article and was shocked that this is still an issue in hospitals today. Not only is it necessary and beneficial for patients to have access to interpreters but there are other benefits as well. For example, it would provide jobs for people who could be interpreters and give the families of patients peace of mind. It was so sad reading about how sometimes the children of patients had to act as interpreters if one was not provided. That type of pressure should not have to fall on a child!


cassidy Richter on Thursday, February 02, 2017 12:39 AM
Oh my gosh Lexa! That is insane! It saddens me to see that a hospital would turn down an interpreter. That is not showing that they care about their patients. Everyone deserves proper care and that cannot be given if no one can understand the person who needs help. Good luck with learning ASL! That is a great skill to have being a nursing student.


Meghan Auclair on Friday, February 03, 2017 6:34 PM
I was shocked to find out that a hospital would refuse an interpreter for someone in the first place. It's just kind of one of those things you expect is a given for people at places like hospitals where the transfer of information is so crucial. I wonder if this is more of an isolated incident or a pretty common thing? It just seems dangerous to risk miscommunication when it comes to a person's health and well being!


Dalimar Romero on Friday, February 03, 2017 8:53 PM
This is an ongoing situation. I'm pretty sure that this has happened various times to various people in various situations. With technology where it is no, things like this should not be happening. Miscommunication in hospitals can be fatal. Doctors should not be bias because if they are, then they should not be doctors. Everyone has the right to communicate in their language and no one should be denied of that right. The person needing the services should get the services they need without ifs ans or buts. This is so disturbing. I hope that the court finds the hospital wrong and takes into account how dangerous it could be for deaf people not to have an interpreter with them when necessary.


Ivelianisse Morales on Monday, February 06, 2017 10:47 AM
I am a medical interpreter (not yet for ASL working on it, though) and it bothers me so much when people do not get the services they need (no I'm not just saying that because I get more money that way) but we don't understand how little foreign languages speakers understand. We just assume everyone understands something but no even if they understand 85% they need and interpreter. Especially people who are deaf, sign language doesn't just sign, its facial expression and body language it entails so much more than most hearing people understand.


Kirsten Mattson on Friday, January 27, 2017 10:42 PM
I read an article about some of the differences between the Deaf and hearing. Most of the article was reinforcing something we all know. Deaf people rely on their vison to communicate and exchange information. It also mentioned that the Deaf culture has different components including traditions, behavioral norms, values and language. The part I thought was most interesting was the different values. Some differences that stuck out to me were interpreters vs. speakers, captioning vs. dialogue and vibrating vs sound alerting. I know most of these differences but seeing it written down makes it more concrete. Another interesting thing about my article was the traditions. Some are based on community events that showcase Deaf history, folklore, songs ect. These are passes down by generation in schools, churches, and even in secret. I liked this article, it was short sweet and to the point.
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kirsten mattson on Saturday, January 28, 2017 12:01 AM
Having siblings with special needs who have used different communication tactics I couldn’t agree more. I think that there needs to be more open compunction within familys regarding different cultures and communication styles. Hopefully we can all lead my example and help be an advocate for the Deaf community.
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Cynthia Rivera on Wednesday, February 01, 2017 8:45 PM
I could have not agreed more, the deaf community needs more from the people. Its as if most people not not educated enough in helping the deaf community.


Meghan Auclair on Saturday, January 28, 2017 12:50 PM
I found an article about new technology in the deaf community which I found interesting. Navid Azodi and Thomas Pryor, two students from the University of Washington, have developed a set of gloves that can translate ASL to spoken english using bluetooth, a central computer, and a speaker. This achievement has even earned them the Lemelson-MIT Student prize and $10,000. They say that the inspiration for this invention, which they have named SignAloud, was in giving those who communicate using ASL a practical method of translation in everyday life. Thomas Pryor describes the gloves as "lightweight, compact and worn on the hands, but ergonomic enough to use as an everyday accessory, similar to hearing aids or contact lenses.” In the article there is a video included which shows a pair of the gloves in action as Pryor uses them to translate while he signs; introducing himself and Azodi as well as the competition they had entered the glove in. I think it would be every interesting if we saw this technology in our everyday life because of the ease it might lend to the deaf community in certain situations while navigating the hearing world. And I think it would also be a plus for people to have the choice to use their own language when doing things like ordering food from a restaurant instead of using notes if desired. If anyone would like to read the article and/or watch the video this is the link: http://www.washington.edu/news/2016/04/12/uw-undergraduate-team-wins-10000-lemelson-mit-student-prize-for-gloves-that-translate-sign-language/
Reply to comment
 
Luz DeJesus on Monday, January 30, 2017 12:21 PM
I find this article very fascinating. How great for them guys to invent something very useful. I think they did a great job and now can have conversations with anyone. I can just imagine how much this device will cost if put in the market.


Alina Schultz on Tuesday, January 31, 2017 12:00 AM
I found this article to be very fascinating! This invention can be quite useful and will help the communication barrier between those who use ASL and everyone who does not.


Robin Fordham on Friday, February 03, 2017 6:42 PM
I recall seeing this invention recently, but did not give it much thought at the time. I can see how a device like this would be an excellent when-needed tool to bridge situations where a translator is not available. However, learning how sign language is constructed, it would not be a true interpreter. I'm curious to know how a translation of signs 'sounds' in spoken form. Would 'spoken' ASL be challenging for native english speakers to understand? The gloves can provide a translation from the signs, but the contest and nuance would surely not be there.


Shaina Canales on Sunday, January 29, 2017 3:35 PM
I decided to look up facts about Deaf Culture. One thing that really caught my attention was the fact about looking at a persons face rather then their hands while they are signing because facial expression is important when signing especially depending on the topic being discussed and how signs can have multiple meanings. I am now enrolled in ASL 101 and I think this might be something I would struggle with trying to keep up in a conversation. Anyone have any input on how they were able to keep up with signs while looking at the persons face? Does it get easier?
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Luz DeJesus on Monday, January 30, 2017 12:12 PM
I too found that Deaf people looking at the face instead of the signing interesting. I think it's easier to look at facial expression while signing because you are signing very close to the face. Maybe they focus more on your face to tell if it's a good or bad thing you are saying since sign language says the same thing, but the face conveys something else.


Robin Fordham on Friday, February 03, 2017 6:51 PM
I am guessing that as well all get better at understanding signs automatically (not having to 'translate' in our heads) we will be able to focus more on the face than the hands. I definitely find it challenging to not focus on the hands at this point, but having learned other foreign languages, I know it is just a matter of time (and practice! watching and signing!) before the brain begins to put certain signs on autopilot. I know I still can think this way about some french words - I don't have to think about the translation of them in my head at the same time I am hearing or speaking them - it's just automatic. That automatic aspect will no doubt naturally allow the focus to change over time.


Luz DeJesus on Sunday, January 29, 2017 3:54 PM
As I was reading this article, the thing that stood out to me the most was the fact that Deaf people look at the face, and not the hands when communicating. Facial Expression is important in sign language to help the person with what you are conveying. When Deaf people are trying to grab someone's attention they tap on someone's shoulder, bang or tap on a table, but when there's a large group setting they might flash the lights off and on. Somethings Deaf people might find rude when you're trying to get their attention is waving your hands in front of their face, stomping on the floor, jabbing the person or grabbing their hands refraining them from signing. As a new student in ASL and joining the Deaf community I thought this was an important thing for people to know.
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Alicia Parzych on Monday, January 30, 2017 4:59 PM
I’m also new in ASL and I’m glad to learn that reading facial expressions is just as important as using hands. Also, I’m glad to know some of the behaviors that are considered rude when trying to get someone’s attention.


Hailea on Monday, January 30, 2017 8:49 PM
I agree with what you are saying, as more and more people learn about deaf culture and all the ways to get someones attention. If more people learned about ways to properly get a deaf persons attention, instead of jabbing them and bring rude, then there would be more communication between those who can hear and those who cannot.


Marina Blanusa on Friday, February 03, 2017 9:55 PM
I used to believe that learning sign language is all about signs and had no idea how important facial expressions are. It was news to me that raising your eyebrows or tilting your head is part of grammar in ASL. I have to admit that I had the hard time focusing on facial expressions(or making correct facial expressions) while signing or watching other people sign. I hope with time and practice this is going to get easier. It was very important for me to learn appropriate behavior such as tapping on someone's shoulder to get attention. Luz, I agree with your statement that this is a very important thing to know.


Hailea on Monday, January 30, 2017 1:08 PM
I feel very strongly about every person getting equal rights. In North Korea 98% of Koreans are illiterate. This does not really surprise me because of North Koreas history, but however it is not fair to any handicapped person to not be able to read or write. Deaf people have it even harder, if they cannot speak or hear and are illiterate, that makes communicating with anyone almost impossible.
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Carlos Valdes on Monday, January 30, 2017 10:45 PM
Wow that's really sad, I can only imagine how hard it must be for them to communicate or even to try and express how they feel. It must kill them inside knowing no one can understand what they are trying to say or do. Didn't realize it was that bad over there.


Cynthia Rivera on Friday, February 03, 2017 10:24 PM
It is hard to hear something like that.I can't believe in the 21 century there still illiterate people in Korea. A deaf person most suffer not knowing how to read,write or sign proper Korean. If they can't go to school to learn how to read and write they wont be able communicate their needs.


Krystenlee Pepin on Monday, January 30, 2017 3:35 PM
My name is Krystenlee, it is Monday, January 30th, 2017 and the time is 12:51pm. During the last couple of days I have been reading about Cochlear Implants because I was planning on doing my first blog post on all of the positive things about them. The title of that paper would have probably ending up being "Technologies Available" or something along those lines, but what I learned through reading about not only Cochlear Implants but also the cultures in which deaf people live has changed the way I'll think of the implants forever. As a hearing individual with only a little experience with the Deaf community I've always assumed that everyone who couldn't hear wanted to, as I'm sure many people within the hearing community do. But after doing some research for my "Technologies Available" paper, I learned that the most of the people within the Deaf community feel pride in themselves and pride in the entire culture to which they belong. And they feel that they are who they are and why would they change? There isn't anything wrong with being deaf and while I've never thought of any deaf individual as disabled, I've never not thought about it either. The articles that I've read have opened my eyes to both the strength and normalcy of being deaf. And after glimpsing the proud and supportive culture of the Deaf community I'm left wondering how I could have ever assumed that anyone would want to change who they are. http://gupress.gallaudet.edu/excerpts/CIEP.html http://www.deaflinx.com/DeafCommunity/culture.html
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Chanly Duong on Monday, January 30, 2017 11:57 PM
I found too interesting into the Cochlear Implants. It lightens up the chance to cure and to physically support this community for some cases. I do think the same way that there is nothing wrong with being deaf, the society is so more open to understand each other and to create equal chances for everybody.


Meghan Auclair on Friday, February 03, 2017 6:01 PM
I thought that it is fascinating to read about the differing opinions that families in the deaf community have about their children getting cochlear implants. I was generally under the impression that all deaf families were against cochlear implants and the majority of hearing families went straight for cochlear implants. I liked being able to see the perspective of the deaf mothers on their children's growth in spoken communication while comparing it to their own experiences.


Alicia Parzych on Monday, January 30, 2017 4:42 PM
Hi Everyone. I’m new in learning about ASL and felt it was important to learn the basics of deaf culture. This article is a great article to read if you’re in the beginning stages of learning about ASL. It explains what it’s like to be deaf and also the positive sides of being deaf. It helps you understand what it’s like to be in their world. I’ve learned they have a very tight-knit community and are very proud of their culture!
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Cynthia Rivera on Wednesday, February 01, 2017 8:49 PM
Yes! the deaf community is an amazing world to learn and I like to think they are the most kindest people around.


Alina Schultz on Monday, January 30, 2017 7:41 PM
I found this Ted Talk Video to be very inspiring. In this video Pamela Weisman shared what inspired her to learn sign language. She also shared her experiences of learning it. She pointed out some really important things. The hearing tend to not make as much effort to interact with the deaf, or learn much about the deaf culture. While, the deaf on the other hand, must make every effort to learn from the hearing and be a part of the hearing culture, since they are always around hearing people. This, and the fact that hearing people see themselves as superior to the deaf can also cause resentment among the deaf towards the hearing. Hearing people tend to address the deaf as “hearing impaired”. This implies that they are handicapped, or disabled and that they need to be “fixed”. The deaf do not see their hearing loss as a impairment or a handicap. They see it as a culture that they cherish; although the hearing still see them as handicapped. This is why the deaf and hearing have a tendency to separate themselves from each other. Everyone, whether deaf, hard of hearing, or hearing should be able to follow their dreams, but the lack of understanding and the discrimination from the hearing interfere. For example, I am hard of hearing and wear hearing aids. I would like to become a police officer one day. I have done my research and have found that within the requirements of becoming a police officer, you cannot have a hearing loss of greater than 30 decibels and hearing aids are a disqualification. Deafness should not be viewed as an impairment or so much as a disability, but as a culture. Here is the Link to the video of “Opening our Ears to the Deaf” Pamela Weisman at TEDxCoMo: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z6srfOyIVpQ
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Francisco Garcia on Wednesday, February 01, 2017 8:45 PM
I believe is true that the hearing don’t make much effort to communicate with the Deaf. They notice that they’re Deaf and they rather just not talk to them. It’s as if they have a “disease” or something. They want people to try and communicate with them especially if they’re of hearing. Yes, I completely agree with you that they should be able to follow their dreams without being discriminated. Keep following your dreams, I hope you do become a police officer one day.


Meghan Auclair on Friday, February 03, 2017 6:22 PM
I found it very interesting how you pointed out the way that most hearing people do nothing to accommodate deaf people, but deaf people have to do so much all of the time to adjust to living in a hearing world. I kind of had that idea in my head before reading this but seeing it stated so plainly like that really made me realize how much of an imbalance in effort there is.


Marina Blanusa on Friday, February 03, 2017 10:42 PM
Thank you so much for sharing this video. Very powerful. Her statement:"ASL is not just a language, it is art", has such a great meaning. The presenter of this video gave me a hope that using facial expressions is going to get easier and more natural. Talking about her feelings, confusion, and apprehension during first ASL class made me realize that it is OK to feel this way. Also, watching this video I've learned to never call a deaf person "hearing impaired" or person with"disability". I will forever remember this.This video definitely gave me a better understanding of deaf community. Thank you one more time for sharing this video!


Alicia Parzych on Monday, February 06, 2017 1:52 PM
Great video. I enjoyed learning about Pamela Weisman's passion for ASL. I'm also learning that communicating with ASL creates a stronger connection to the person you are communicating with. Pamela said "Sign language forces you to be emotionally open and available." She also explains her new appreciation for her hearing, and after just two classes of ASL, I do too.


Carlos Valdes on Monday, January 30, 2017 11:14 PM
I found this amazing article on how a bank in the U.K. Came up with new technology that is deaf friendly. There are over 250,00 and if not more people in the U.K. Who use BSL (British Sign Language) on a daily and it just got easier for them when going to the bank. The technology is called "signly" and basically it allows people to scan their signly enabled literature on their smart phone which then translates it in BSL through augmented reality. Signly incorporated both written and online material helping people who are in the deaf community understand better what there being shown.
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Cythia Rivera on Wednesday, February 01, 2017 7:57 PM
I also find this so amazing it's nice too see the BSL expanding, and creating ways to make communication easier for the deaf community.


Francisco Garcia on Wednesday, February 01, 2017 8:25 PM
This article is really surprising. They should come up with a new technology here in the U.S. It would help a lot of people being able to communicate with the Deaf. Not many people know sign language so it is difficult for them to communicate. Although there will be a con to having this technology but over the years it can get fixed and made better.


Marina Blanusa on Friday, February 03, 2017 9:33 PM
With such a rapid technology development there is much brighter future for all people with disabilities. Every day we hear about new innovations and our society is making great strides towards the better life for deaf people. Although, new technology is imperative for better and easier life for deaf communities I believe that learning a sign language is very important and should not be replaced with new innovations and devices.


Alicia Parzych on Monday, February 06, 2017 3:01 PM
It's great that new technology is being created to make it easier for the BSL community to communicate. If Signly becomes successful, I hope that we can also use it here. Technology does take away from human interaction, but if it can help with communication, I'm all for it!


Chanly Duong on Monday, January 30, 2017 11:41 PM
I have read the article about Deaf Culture and Community from handsandvoices.org. The article has provided me a chance to know better about interaction among deaf culture, ASL and the deaf community. ASL has been considered as the core of culturally Deaf identity. Because through ASL, not only Deaf people but all others are able to share expression and to communicate inside the community. Our body languages are one important part of that, such as using hands, faces, eyes in order to communicate and to be understood. I have a sense of ASL is not limited to any community in particular. Everybody from different background, ethnicity and ages can use as the popular way to communicate. And so far, like other learning method, deaf people through ASL access history, value and be part of rooted deaf culture. That’s why deaf organization at local or nation level has been around over a century, to create a deaf community to work on deaf civil right and empower individuals, like any other communities around the states. The most touching part is deaf people talk about the sense of belonging they feel upon their first experience in this type of environment. They feel “home”, the feeling of ability to understand others like them and to be understood in the way they able to share, to be human fulfilled. The article also highlight the importance of parents and professional should notice when we are in deaf community. Especially parents, how they teach their deaf children at first or even how they know the proper way to communicate with their own kids before the kids are sent to school to learn ASL. Parents also face challenge of being involved into the community and not be afraid of losing their own kids to the community. Deaf children and people have equal share of using technology. They can use bilingual as ASL and English in written, which support to them more chances. Being a part of community to be strong and empowering, to create more equal share, and to have more opportunity as others.
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Cynthia Rivera on Wednesday, February 01, 2017 8:26 PM
I found this article to be very insightful to people interested in learning Deaf culture. It explains the issues that the Deaf may face.


Cynthia Rivera on Tuesday, January 31, 2017 7:09 PM
Cynthia Rivera Professor King ASL 102.01 1/30/17 Can You Read My Lips This article is very interesting because it shows how difficult it is for a Deaf individual to communicate with a hearing person by lip reading . Statistics show that 30 -40 percent of the English Language can understood by lip reading alone. Hearing people have to understand not all Deaf individual know how to read lips or know about ASL. It is not simple for Deaf people to have a conversation one on one with a hearing people. Hearing people have to be more patient when a Deaf person try to communicate. One quote from the article explains, “just because a person who is Deaf can read lips does not mean that is the best way to communicate with them”.Not everyone who has implants chooses to read lip or know ASL or chooses a lipreading over auxiliary aids. I think this article it is very good because it shows that not every Deaf person reads lips or not every HOH uses lipreading to communicate.The government should make basic ASL mandatory in school, so that way hearing people can communicate with a Deaf individual.
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Francisco Garcia on Wednesday, February 01, 2017 8:36 PM
What is the link to this article? I would like to read it. It’s true that not all Deaf people are able to read lips. As for your last sentence “The government should make basic ASL mandatory in school, so that way hearing people can communicate with a Deaf individual.” I would agree with you because they have other languages that is mandatory especially in high school. Introducing ASL would make everything much more easier for people to communicate with the Deaf.


Carlos Valdes on Tuesday, February 07, 2017 12:08 AM
Absolutely. Having French, English and Chinese is good and all to learn but Sign is more common than what people might think. And in the long run we might use ASL more than we would use any other language. The odds of running into another speaking native is common but usually they know some type of English. Granted you might not be so lucky if you run into someone who only signs because there aren't as many teachers out there sharing it in schools.


Cynthia Rivera on Wednesday, February 01, 2017 8:39 PM
Cynthia Rivera Professor King ASL 102.01 1/31/17 Can Digital Device Replace Interpreter New technology used for communication can be good in some ways. This article shows differences if you have to write and make video calls. But for ASL it doesn’t show all because when you sign it is very important look at facial expression, that i s where the grammar is and that is something a technology machine will never capture. Interpreters know about culture and sign language. They are the bridge one on one between Deaf individual and the hearing people.Technology digital divice will never replicate the feel of conection,interpreter can convey emotions, digitals can’t. Digital device can do live easier for Deaf Americans only when they are communicating between Deaf people and the hearing world. New technology does not replace ASL interpreters.
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Cassidy Richter on Thursday, February 02, 2017 12:21 AM
This Is What It Is Like To Be Deaf From Birth. In this article, Cristina Hartmann tell what it is like for her to be deaf from birth. She did not experience anything differently than hearing people did, other than in education. She joined the Little League and when in college she joined a sorority. Her parents put her into a infant deaf program and from there she learned to socialize with different types of people at a young age. Cristina ended up getting a cochlear implant, kind of similar to a hearing aid, so that she would be able to hear. People would tease her and call her a failure because even though she had a CI she still used ASL. To her it did not matter, she stated that to her, "silence was peaceful and soothing." Called her being deaf more of an inconvenience than anything. I enjoyed reading Cristina's story and found it inspiring. A quote that I liked from her she said, "My deafness was never a tragedy. It is just a different way of living."
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Cynthia Rivera on Friday, February 03, 2017 9:51 AM
Your article shows how tDeaf individuals are the same as Hearing individuals. The only difference is the way they communicate. As you write education was the only place Cristina had a different experience. We need to make sure schools are prepared to have Deaf students, so their experience is a good one.


Alicia Parzych on Monday, February 06, 2017 2:27 PM
I really enjoyed reading this article. Cristina has such an understanding of herself, and it was beautiful to read. She did a great job expressing her experiences, to explain that being deaf isn't a bad thing, it's just different. Her positive outlook on her life is truly inspiring.


Alina Schultz on Tuesday, February 07, 2017 12:19 AM
I found this article to be very intriguing. Cristina's parents decided to have her learn ASL because she got no benefit from her hearing aids whatsoever. Deafness has shown her to see the world in a different way. She never looks at her deafness as a tragedy, but just as a different way of living.


Michelle Gordon on Tuesday, February 07, 2017 12:30 AM
To be born deaf can be challenging. To be put on the fence of a difficult choice on whether to stick with ASL or utilizing the CI was and still is very difficult especially when receiving so much back lash from both parties. Why not be able to have the best of both words, similar to knowing more than one language. People need to educate themselves rather than bashing one another for reasons which aren't 100% understood. This article was a great read.


Carlos Valdes on Tuesday, February 07, 2017 12:33 AM
I actually really, really enjoyed reading this article. Just to know how she grew up and the things her family did to make sure she had a normal, regular childhood makes me happy. Im sure in the 80's ASL was not commonly taught so communicating must of been a challenge for sure. It's sad how she said alot of people didn't even try to communicate with her or wouldn't even make effort. She must've felt terrible. This is definitely a good read.


Cassidy Richter on Thursday, February 02, 2017 12:27 AM
Sorry everyone,I forgot to post the actual article haha hear it is http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/12/23/this-is-what-it-is-like-to-be-deaf-from-birth.html
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Chanly Duong on Monday, February 06, 2017 2:53 PM
Thank you for your link. I have read the article and being touching a lot. Being born dead isn't good at all and sometimes we are just born the way we are created and have no choice. However, the story inspires me a lot about the person and her family have gone through over their situations, from very first steps through education and worked well with whole community. Plus, being born deaf may take away a lot of wonderful things, such as music, sense of the world around us but don't give up and keep fighting against the fate is the excellent choice. I can see the strength of dead community and how people work hard to make their lives better every single day


Cynthia Rivera on Friday, February 03, 2017 11:18 PM
Can Digital Device Replace Interpreter New technology used for communication can be good in some ways. This article shows the difference between communicating with Deaf individuals through technology and interpreters. Technology has helped Deaf people communicate with hearing people through technology that helps them write and make video calls. For ASL, technology doesn’t show all, because when you sign it is very important to look at facial expression, that is where the grammar is, and that is something a machine will never capture. Interpreters know about culture and sign language. They are the one on one bridge between Deaf individual and the hearing people. Digital devices will never replicate the feel of connection, interpreters can convey emotions, digitals can’t. Digital devices can make life easier for Deaf Americans, especially when they are communicating between Deaf people and the hearing world. New technology can never replace ASL interpreters. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lydia-l-callis/can-digital-devices-repla-asl_b_5565144.html
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Brenda Rosario on Saturday, February 04, 2017 5:17 PM
Brenda Rosario, February 4 2017, at 4:00 pm. Researching some information and read that there are passing two law historical bills into law. They want to establish a library to the Deaf Community. This will help the Deaf to have a better resource and have the opportunity to have a staff that will understand their needs. They are coordinating the gaps of how to fill the positions that will be offer to the Deaf Community. Also,one of the requirement will be that the staff in this services will be a Deaf person or someone with hearing impairment. These are some of the associations that are involves in this great change; Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI)program, Governor's Office of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (ODHH), Maryland Association of the Deaf (MDAD). They will like others associations to be united to their great movement. WWW.nad.org.
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Michelle Gordon on Saturday, February 04, 2017 6:55 PM
In the article “Karen Graham starting Sign1News network for sign language users” I learned about Karen Graham. After twenty years of being a news anchor for Fox 5 News, Karen Graham is onto a new venture. Karen is bringing American Sign Language to CNN news through her network Sing1News. While CNN is not sponsoring her, she has found sponsorship through other interested vendors. Her purpose is to have consistency since closed captioning is not the best at times. The Network will primarily be in American Sign Language. While Karen is the head of this project, she will not be on camera. She is currently looking for producers and actors to get her network running. She will start off with two shows and branch out to where her network will be available 24/7. Karen’s passion to learn ASL came from a calling from God. She took American Sign Language while in college and continued into the deaf community. She is very familiar with the deaf culture, finding it to be a beautiful language. http://radiotvtalk.blog.ajc.com/2017/01/06/karen-graham-starting-sign1news-network-for-sign-language-users/
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Shaina Canales on Monday, February 06, 2017 10:50 PM
I came across this article and one of the 8 things mentioned was about addressing a person being deaf and the correct terms to use. I loved it because like it says about calling a Deaf person hearing impaired and it focusing on what the person can't do. It's true. You really have to think about how you say things to people and how it may make them feel. I work with people that have various forms of developmental delays and I hate when people refer to them as "mentally retarded", "slow", etc. They are human beings and they have feelings. Yes they face challenges and learn things differently and at a different pace but they are still the same as a "normal" person.
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Alina Schultz on Tuesday, February 07, 2017 12:11 AM
This was a very interesting article. It is true that many people view the deaf community as a group of people with a disability, but to deaf people, their community is their own culture. The term "hearing impaired" focuses on what people can't do. I like how this article points out that you should be careful about making suggestions, such as asking why they don't have a cochlear implant or hearing aids, for this can be hurtful or offensive.


Michelle Gordon on Tuesday, February 07, 2017 12:14 AM
As people, we are all the same.I do feel that saying a person is hearing impaired or a deaf-mute is offensive. I also thought the term hard of hearing was an offensive term until after reading this article. My mother always told us we were hard of hearing because we would not listen. I guess that is a typical Jamaican saying.


Michelle Gordon on Tuesday, February 07, 2017 12:28 AM
To be born deaf can be challenging. To be put on the fence of a difficult choice on whether to stick with ASL or utilizing the CI was and still is very difficult especially when receiving so much back lash from both parties. Why not be able to have the best of both words, similar to knowing more than one language. People need to educate themselves rather than bashing one another for reasons which aren't 100% understood. This article was a great read.


Carlos Valdes on Tuesday, February 07, 2017 12:43 AM
Couldn't agree more. Yes they might have delays, or some type of problems but they are just like me and you. Regualr people who just want to be accepted. I work at a summer camp for special needs kids and adults and a lot of them are deaf and have delays and it bothers me when people address them in a topic like that. You'd be very surprised as to what they know and don't. Gotta be careful what you say around people.


Alina Schultz on Tuesday, February 07, 2017 12:03 AM
I found this Ted Talk video to be very interesting and inspirational. This video is of Rachel Kolb, who was born profoundly deaf and had trouble learning to speak. She did 18 years of speech therapy and used the tools she learned to correct herself when she made a mistake when talking. She shared her experience of giving a presentation in front of her class in middle school. Her teacher said “You should never speak like that infront of a group without an interpreter. It is not fair to anyone who has to listen to you.” This feedback from her teacher made her feel like her attempt to communicate effectively was a complete failure. She made a good point that “society has a tendency to focus on disability rather than ability.” Rachel has determined that challenges are not limitations. I found it very interesting that according to the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders/National Institutes of Health, that about every 2 to 3 out of every 1,000 children in the U.S. are born deaf or hard-of-hearing. Then, 9 out of 10 children who are born deaf are born to parents who can hear. Only 10% of these families, ever learn to communicate effectively with their deaf or hard-of-hearing child. Many of Rachel’s family, friends, and peers, as well as teachers did not look at her as disabled. But some people could be quicker to make judgements about what they thought deafness means. Deaf people are capable of doing anything hearing people can do, except hear. Deafness at it’s core is a communication barrier. We should all resist classifying others based on their disabilities, and instead focus on their abilities. Here is the link to the video “Navigating deafness in a hearing world” | Rachel Kolb | TEDxStanford : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uKKpjvPd6Xo
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Michelle Gordon on Monday, February 20, 2017 11:13 PM
Alina, you are absolutely right! To classify individuals based on their disabilities is wrong. Look at what they are capable of doing. For a teacher to judge like that goes to show she isn't aware of certain things. Rachael was more than capable to do her presentation. So what if she sounded different. She achieved what she set out to do proving her ability to do her presentation. Allow Rachael to be great.


Shaina Canales on Sunday, February 12, 2017 10:30 PM
So I was looking at trending topics in the deaf community and came across this article that discusses having open captioning in movie theatres. I think that they should have open captioning because isn't fair for someone that is deaf/hard of hearing to have to pay for a movie and use a device that half the time does not work. They should be able to get the same full movie experience as those that are hearing. People are claiming it is bothersome to have to see the words coming up at the bottom of the screen, imagine how bothersome it is for someone who is deaf/hard of hearing trying to understand what is taking place in a movie with no captions or device to help them understand what is going on. Yet they are paying just as much money to watch the same movie as someone who is hearing. And I get that some theatres have movie times that have captions on them but I am sure those are earlier in the day and maybe not for all movies.I don't think it is fair.
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Michelle Gordon on Monday, February 20, 2017 11:24 PM
Shaina, I agree with you, opening captioning should be offered at every theater. Deaf people would like to watch a movie just as much as anyone else and in a normal setting. I feel if they cannot make it an open captioning, why not have the movies with open and closed captioning run at the same time. The movies should be offered equally. One thing I will commend movie theaters on doing, they offer pen and paper to guests who are deaf. Which is one step in the right direction.


Michelle Gordon on Monday, February 20, 2017 10:58 PM
The article is based off of a family who goes out to a fast food restaurant and usually interacts with a young adult who knows American Sign Language. The author journalist found it fascinating that the young man communicates using sign language rather than speaking verbally. The young man is a CODA (Children of Deaf Adults) or a child of a deaf Adult. When ever the family visits the restaurant, the young man is always called upon to assist the family. Bringing up the point, why isn't ASL being taught as a second language. We are all taught to use English or Spanish, but ASL is not offered. Why not? I feel ASL in Junior High School and high school would be just as beneficial as learning Spanish or any other second language.
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